Ramadan 2017: Is Ramadan Mubarak or Ramadan Kareem the correct greeting? - Top Post

Ramadan 2017: Is Ramadan Mubarak or Ramadan Kareem the correct greeting?

Ramadan 2017: Is Ramadan Mubarak or Ramadan Kareem the correct greeting?

Ramadan 2017: 9 questions about the Muslim holy month you were too embarrassed to ask

Ramadan 2017: Is Ramadan Mubarak or Ramadan Kareem the correct greeting?

Canadian PM Trudeau wishes ‘Ramadan Mubarak’ to Muslims, stresses inclusiveness     

The Muslim holy month of Ramadan starts Friday evening, and most of the world’s 1.6 billion Muslims will be observing. This means there’s a good chance you might encounter someone — a friend, a co-worker, the barista making your latte at Starbucks, yourRamadan. child’s teacher — who is celebrating

Ramadan.

 

But what is Ramadan, exactly? And how can I make sure I don’t accidentally offend my Muslim friends and acquaintances during Ramadan?

We’ve got you covered: Here are the most basic answers to the most basic questions about Ramadan.

1) What is Ramadan actually about?

Ramadan is the most sacred month of the year for Muslims — the Prophet Mohammed reportedly said, “When the month of Ramadan starts, the gates of heaven are opened and the gates of Hell are closed and the devils are chained.”

Muslims believe it was during this month that God revealed the first verses of the Quran, Islam’s sacred text, to Mohammed, on a night known as “The Night of Power” (Laylat al-Qadr in Arabic)

Is Ramadan Mubarak or Ramadan Kareem correct?

Ramadan Mubarak is the most common greeting used by Muslims, and translates to “have a blessed Ramadan”.

Ramadan Kareem is another phrase often used, however there is some debate as to whether it is appropriate.

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Some say that the phrase, which means “may Ramadan be generous to you”, goes against the teachings of Islam because Ramadan itself cannot be generous.

As Saudi Arabian scholar Sheikh Al-Uthaymeen explained, “it should be said ‘Ramadan Mubarak’, or whatever is similar to it, because it is not Ramadan itself that gives so that it can be kareem (generous), in fact it is Allah who placed the grace in it, and made it a special month, and a time to perform one of the pillars of Islam”.

WHAT IS RAMADAN?

GETTY

Ramadan: Muslim boys hugging on Eid al-Fitr

Ramdan: Muslims breaking their fast

Ramdan: Muslims breaking their fast

Others argue that Kareem is acceptable, because the wording reflects the blessings that God gives to his followers during the month.

Jordan’s Iftaa’ Department, which is responsible for religious decrees, last year ruled: “Describing Ramadan to be honourable does not in fact attribute the quality to the month.

“Rather, the word comes from the fact that God gives his worshippers blessings during the month.

“It’s thus acceptable to call the thing by the name of its reason or cause. The ruling could be seen as an example of synecdoche, in which a part of something is taken to stand for its whole, or vice versa.

For those who would rather avoid the debate, Happy Ramadan is a perfectly acceptable alternative.

The final day of Ramadan this year falls on Saturday June 24.

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