Why India needs to be aggressive against China in Doklam standoff - Top Post

Why India needs to be aggressive against China in Doklam standoff

Why India needs to be aggressive against China in Doklam standoff

India-China border row may lead to war, says US expert 

More than the Doklam issue, Bhutan worried about hydropower projects and trade

 lack of understanding of the increasingly complex and diversified nature of the relationship between the two countries

Ajit Doval lands in Beijing amid Doklam standoffTo make it eminently clear, while Doklam is allegedly “disputed” territory between Bhutan and China it has a far bigger impact on India’s security, in the analysis of India’s own experts and commentators.

  • Ajit Doval lands in Beijing amid Doklam standoff

    Ajit Doval lands in Beijing amid Doklam standoff

    Letter to the Editor: Rule of law

                                     Letter to the Editor: Rule of law

    Now China’s Foreign Minister steps in: India must pull back from Doklam

    Now China’s Foreign Minister steps in: India must pull back from Doklam

The Doklam standoff on territory claimed by Bhutan has gone on for a full 45 days and is expected to go on longer. In this short period there has been a profusion of articles from both Indian and Chinese news outlets that supposes many things for Bhutan, including speculation about the impact this crisis will have in relations between Bhutan and India.

The Royal Government of Bhutan (RGoB) has made its position clear in a demarche issued to the Chinese Embassy in Delhi by the Bhutanese Embassy on June 20, on the road construction being carried out by the Chinese, followed by a more detailed statement issued by Bhutan’s Foreign Ministry on June 29.  India’s Ministry of External Affairs stated on June 30 that it moved into the area after “coordination with the RGoB.”

To make it eminently clear, while Doklam is allegedly “disputed” territory between Bhutan and China it has a far bigger impact on India’s security, in the analysis of India’s own experts and commentators.  This is one key reason why Bhutan did not accept a generous ‘package deal’ from China in 1996, that offered not only the larger disputed 495 sq km in the central sector but also a part of the 269 sq km western sector, in exchange for sections of the 269 sq km which includes Gyemochen, claimed by China as the tri-junction.

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